Charity Bake-off raises £265 for I.B.A.

Charity Bake off at SGE Esplanade Hotel raises £265 for Inspired by Autism!

  Last Sunday we had a wonderful day at the Inspired by Autism Bake off event that took place at SGE Esplanade Hotel in Dunoon. Rebecca MacRaild, the hotel’s events manager and a parent at Inspired by Autism came up with the idea and used her talents and contacts to set up this fun charity event.

 The day featured competition in several categories that produced an enthusiastic response from the areas gifted bakers with a truly fantastic array of scrumptious cakes. Professional bakers Yolanda and Helena needed all their experience to pick the winning entries in a competition of a very high standard. Many local crafters also attended paying a donation to have a table on the day. We had live music, an exciting raffle, delicious sandwiches and nibbles and a chance to sample those cakes after the judging !

  For my part I was able to talk to people about autism and the support services we provide and to eat a fair amount of cake also!

 It was a real family day and my precious boy made an appearance which was for me  ‘the icing on the cake!’ Sorry!

  Massive thanks to SGE Esplanade Hotel, Rebecca, our lovely judges, the crafters, Tim , David, Poppy and all our winners, musician, hotel staff and especially the bakers and all who attended and contributed to such a great event.

As a charity Inspired by Autism relies on donations to cover our overheads. Over the years people have been very supportive of the work we do and services we provide.

It is of great importance when providing advocacy that the organisation remains independent of potential funders agendas. At Inspired by Autism maximising the wellbeing of autistic people and families will always be the priority.

I.B.A.15B13B6C-DB33-43CB-9CAB-90FB802E36E9

The Lonesome death of legal entitlement.

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When Dylan sang about the murder of Hattie Carroll he ridiculed the idea that the ‘ladder of law has no top or no bottom ‘. It’s a powerful and moving song that challenges the inequities in the American justice system in the 1960’s.
Listening to a lawyer talk about present day Scottish legislation affecting children with disabilities at recent training events it struck me how little our modern Acts and legal system has improved. Inequality is sadly still very prevalent despite promising terminology. Furthermore our contemporary Scottish Acts have ‘no bottom ‘ in the sense that they are weak and are largely not enforceable by ordinary families. Dip into the Education (ASL) Act, the Equality Act or the Regulation of Care Act and see how far you get against the ‘ big fish.’ Terminology is often almost impossibly vague and when challenges are mounted local authorities and health boards have the legal resources to bankrupt most individuals who would put up a fight. No wonder they thumb their nose at ‘statutory’ obligations !
Pursuing ‘statutory ‘ entitlement is so often a highly complex, emotionally challenging and draining system for families living with disabilities. It brings ridicule to any notion of social justice and shame to us all.

I.B.A.

The GP, the MP, the NP and the DWP.

Today a small victory occurred for a family I work with at IBA. It was not perhaps of huge significance in the grand scale of the inequality faced by people living with disability. It was however the culmination of a 7 month struggle. It was a determined effort to stand up for the rights of a child let down by a system that had shown a cumulative lack of understanding and compassion. That is all it takes to fail a young person and family who bravely face great challenges on a daily basis.
The conduct of those who had influence and power in these matters stands in stark contrast. Self interest and a refusal to stand up and speak up lest they risk their position and privileges characterised their failures.
A safety net that should be a cornerstone of a civilised society has been fought for and won. I’ll sleep a little bit better tonight knowing that.

I.B.A.

E9BCEC9D-3DC8-4F78-A6E1-4AECE47FCF6310 examples of real discrimination experienced by people with disability right here and right now.

1. Despite all our disability legislation most individuals and families could never afford to make legal challenges. Service providers and local authorities know this and often behave accordingly, rendering our laws worthless.
2. Tolerance of diversity is limited and mocking people with disabilities is sadly still common place – from the President of the US to the young woman who was mocking Andy in the Co-op tonight. ( if only she had any idea of the challenges he faces and the courage he shows everyday)
3. Professionals displaying their “we know best attitude “ based on nothing more than arrogance and self importance.
4. A widespread abuse of parking bays for blue badge holders by people who simply don’t care. (I’ve stopped challenging – it’s embarrassing, stressful and often dangerous.)
5. The targeting of essential services , facilities and support by individuals in power and their organisations based on lies masked by jargon and unproven concepts.
6. The frequent practice of government and politicians using disability as a way to score points.
7. The impossible demands made by society on unpaid carers.
8. The reduction in social workers, Welfare right officers and an almost complete lack of independent advocacy.
9. The all too common usage of dehumanising language when referring to people with disabilities.
10. A pervading culture of fear around making a stand against these discriminations based on threats to employment and being ostracised for not behaving like sheep.

The need for listening, honest judgement and displaying real courage has never been greater for the wellbeing of those affected by disabilities.

I.B.A.